Reblogged from All Salt. All Fire.

transnormativity:

This is a fund set up for the people who have been arrested while protesting in Ferguson. Please donate if you can and share widely. This is concrete action we can take to support the people of Ferguson. Also please call your local representative and let them know you do not agree with what’s happening. Here’s a script and a way to find the contact info for your local reps. 

Please signal boost.

Reblogged from we're shit, queer up
america-wakiewakie:

Amnesty International Calls For Investigation Of Ferguson Police Tactics | Huffington Post
Amnesty International is calling for an investigation of the police tactics used by police in Ferguson, Missouri, where local law enforcement have clashed with protesters following the death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown.
After sending a 12-person delegation to Ferguson to monitor police activity, meet with officials and work with activists, the human rights organization concluded that the city’s policing standards must be scrutinized to ensure they meet key standards.
“Amnesty International has a long and tested history of monitoring and investigating police conduct, not just in foreign countries, but right here at home in the United States,” executive director Steven W. Hawkins said in a Sunday statement. “Our delegation traveled to Missouri to let the authorities in Ferguson know that the world is watching. We want a thorough investigation into Michael Brown’s death and the series of events that followed.”

In addition to a review of local police training and tactics, the group called on state and federal officials to complete a “prompt, thorough, independent and impartial investigation” into Brown’s death. (Brown was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white police officer.)
“This is a moment for people around the country — and around the world — to join the Ferguson community in raising concerns about race and policing, and about the impact of militarization on our fundamental right to peacefully assemble,” Hawkins said.
The recent protests in Ferguson — where police officers have donned riot gear and used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds — have shined a spotlight on the increasing militarization of local police units.
In a Time op-ed last week, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) condemned Ferguson police’s recent conduct, blaming “unprecedented expansion of government power” for the use of military-like tactics by law enforcement.
"There is a legitimate role for the police to keep the peace, but there should be a difference between a police response and a military response," Paul wrote.
On Thursday, Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) announced his plan to introduce legislation aimed at scaling back the militarization of police.
"Our main streets should be a place for business, families, and relaxation, not tanks and M16s," Johnson said in a letter to Democratic colleagues. "Our local police are quickly beginning to resemble paramilitary forces. This bill will end the free transfers of certain aggressive military equipment to local law enforcement and ensure that all equipment can be accounted for."
(Photo Credit: Scott Olson)

america-wakiewakie:

Amnesty International Calls For Investigation Of Ferguson Police Tactics | Huffington Post

Amnesty International is calling for an investigation of the police tactics used by police in Ferguson, Missouri, where local law enforcement have clashed with protesters following the death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown.

After sending a 12-person delegation to Ferguson to monitor police activity, meet with officials and work with activists, the human rights organization concluded that the city’s policing standards must be scrutinized to ensure they meet key standards.

“Amnesty International has a long and tested history of monitoring and investigating police conduct, not just in foreign countries, but right here at home in the United States,” executive director Steven W. Hawkins said in a Sunday statement. “Our delegation traveled to Missouri to let the authorities in Ferguson know that the world is watching. We want a thorough investigation into Michael Brown’s death and the series of events that followed.”

In addition to a review of local police training and tactics, the group called on state and federal officials to complete a “prompt, thorough, independent and impartial investigation” into Brown’s death. (Brown was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white police officer.)

“This is a moment for people around the country — and around the world — to join the Ferguson community in raising concerns about race and policing, and about the impact of militarization on our fundamental right to peacefully assemble,” Hawkins said.

The recent protests in Ferguson — where police officers have donned riot gear and used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds — have shined a spotlight on the increasing militarization of local police units.

In a Time op-ed last week, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) condemned Ferguson police’s recent conduct, blaming “unprecedented expansion of government power” for the use of military-like tactics by law enforcement.

"There is a legitimate role for the police to keep the peace, but there should be a difference between a police response and a military response," Paul wrote.

On Thursday, Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) announced his plan to introduce legislation aimed at scaling back the militarization of police.

"Our main streets should be a place for business, families, and relaxation, not tanks and M16s," Johnson said in a letter to Democratic colleagues. "Our local police are quickly beginning to resemble paramilitary forces. This bill will end the free transfers of certain aggressive military equipment to local law enforcement and ensure that all equipment can be accounted for."

(Photo Credit: Scott Olson)

Reblogged from America Wakie Wakie

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 2 [part 1]

tear gas can kill btw and one reporter saw what looked to be a body on the ground shit is so scary rn. no followup on that yet.

Reblogged from TAJINxQUEEN
You realize that everything the police are doing in Ferguson is carefully calculated, right? They’re purposely turning peaceful protests into riots. They’re purposely committing violence to incite violence. From saying ‘We won’t be answering 911 calls,’ which is a very clever way to set themselves up to be able to say, ‘We were afraid for our safety - any call could really be an ambush, our lives were in danger’ right down to the camouflage and the military tanks and wearing more body armor than a soldier in a war zone. Its exactly why they’re going for a media blackout - yet allowing certain photos through - they WANT you to see their tanks. They want you to see their riot gear. They WANT you to see a war-zone. They’re trying to sell the world the idea that this community is inherently and constantly a source of violence and turmoil - they want you to think that they [the police] are being attacked daily in a place so vicious they need full body armor. You know why? Because then, at the end of the day, you might just be able to believe the story they’re going to spin. They’re going to tell you that this (white) officer goes to work in this war zone every day - that he spends every working moment in constant fear for his life. They’re going to tell you that Michael Brown attacked this officer. And then they’re going to bring up everything that has happened in the aftermath and try to use it to convince you that he shot that little boy because he was afraid for his life. They’re setting up a defense. You mark my words, they’re trying to set up a defense.

My mom’s take on what’s going on in Ferguson (via actualbanshee)

Your mom isn’t wrong. That’s why it’s so important to keep the signal going. Too many are silenced with lies and fear and if they cannot speak then we have to do it for them.

(via auntpol)

shanellbklyn:

dynastylnoire:

stair-diving-with-hayes:

Ladies and Gentleman, the man that will be in history books. He was throwing the burning tear gas. Not to the cops but away from the children protesting. In his American Shirt and bag of chips. Check his twitter.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

HE HAS ALSO STATED NOT TO PURCHASE THE T-SHIRTS THAT ARE BEING SOLD WITH HIS IMAGE BECAUSE HIM NOR THE TOWN OF FERGUSON WILL SEE THAT MONEY! 

Just needs to be stated again! 

Not to the cops but away from the children protesting”

either way woulda been fine tho honestly

Reblogged from Take sides
it is illegal???!!!!

it is illegal???!!!!

Reblogged from Take sides

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

Reblogged from Take sides
thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?August 17, 2014
Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .
Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.
Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.
But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.
Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.
While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.
Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.
After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.
Those never came.
Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.
The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.
In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.
But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.
For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.
After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.
Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.
But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.
Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.
Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.
Source
Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!
Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan NettlesSunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?
August 17, 2014

Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .

Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.

Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.

But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.

Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.

While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.

Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.

After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.

Those never came.

Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.

The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.

In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.

But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.

For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.

After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.

Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.

But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.

Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.

Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.

Source

Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!

Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan Nettles
Sunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.

Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

Reblogged from Take sides
decolonize-all-the-things:

intellocgent:

…just in case you forgot #WakeUp #GoodMorning

THIS IS ACTUALLY INCORRECT:
The statistics actually state that every 28 hours a Black PERSON is killed by the police, vigilantes, or security guards in the US.
This means that in the US, every 28 hours a Black man, woman, boy, girl, &/or Black LGBTQIA* community member is killed by police, vigilantes, or security guards in the US.
STOP THE ERASURE OF THE STATE SANCTIONED GENOCIDE OF BLACK WOMEN, GIRLS, & BLACK LGBTQIA*
ALL BLACK LIVES MATTER

decolonize-all-the-things:

intellocgent:

…just in case you forgot #WakeUp #GoodMorning

THIS IS ACTUALLY INCORRECT:

The statistics actually state that every 28 hours a Black PERSON is killed by the police, vigilantes, or security guards in the US.

This means that in the US, every 28 hours a Black man, woman, boy, girl, &/or Black LGBTQIA* community member is killed by police, vigilantes, or security guards in the US.

STOP THE ERASURE OF THE STATE SANCTIONED GENOCIDE OF BLACK WOMEN, GIRLS, & BLACK LGBTQIA*

ALL BLACK LIVES MATTER

Reblogged from Queer Caribbean Dreams